2018 Independent Author Network “Book of The Year Award” - Short Stories - Finalist

Throughout the weekend of his brother’s funeral, a young man reflects on life. Torment is a crashing wave of emotion. Hunter explores the dynamics of growing up as a poor minority in a small town, facing mental health conditions that most communities would rather not name, even if they could. The story steps through the tangled web of coming-of-age identity crises, complicated by society and the environment around us. Navigating through grieving and rambunctious aunts and uncles, a role model sister he rarely sees, and the ever-mounting pressure of misfortune, the young man has a very important question to answer: What is worth living for?

 

Book Reviews

I love how this novella is broken up into short chapters with witty names that tie directly into the chapter. I feel that recent books never name their chapters anymore and I miss it. The author’s voice is so defined and relatable. You connect with the main character, without even knowing anything about him. From page one, he seems like a trustworthy narrator.  It’s almost as if joining him for this intimate personal journey forms a connection between the reader and the narrator. I enjoyed how real and raw this book is. There aren’t enough books that talk honestly about mental health and how losing a loved one affects you.

Rachel Quinn, Reader's Favorite (full review)

The reason I am sharing so many quotes in this moving novella is to give you examples of the powerful emotions expressed in this young man’s journey as he navigates life growing up poor, black and mentally handicapped…he is aware, maybe more than most of us. He is given a poignant voice, even when he is dissecting everyday activities.

Even though Torment is only 126 pages, author H.D. Hunter succeeds in providing a moving story that will stay with you long after you finish reading the book.

J.D. Jung, Underratedreads.com (full review)  


 
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2016-17 Reader Views Literary Awards, Short Stories, Winner

5th Annual Beverly Hills Book Awards, Short Stories - Winner

10th Annual National Indie Excellence Awards, Short Stories - Finalist

There is a solution to life's every problem, we need only to be a little more creative, a little more aware. Ten stories blur the line between reality and fantasy as protagonists struggle to come to terms with their rose-colored expectations for life and the current nightmares they face. What truly lies behind the magic door of our imaginations? Everything we've ever dreamed...or our worst fears?

 

Purchase A Magic Door and A Lost Kingdom of Peace in any of the following formats:


 
 

Book Reviews

Ultimately they are all a study of the human condition – our faults and foibles, how they affect our behaviour and our decisions and the impact this has on others. Each story speaks to the reader’s ‘inner dreamer’: where the story ends, the imagination has to take over. I did find myself wondering about the fate of some of the characters after the story itself had ended, which is what should happen with a well-crafted short story. I should also mention here that each tale has its own character illustration at the outset, by artist Donahue Johnson, which brings them to life and lends a nice feel to the book.

- Sam Lacey, The Book Reviewers (full review)

 

 

When I read Hunter's book, I felt as if I were sitting on a porch somewhere listening to an older person tell me fables. Hunter is such a story teller. I recommend this book to a broad range of readers, young adult to adults, and parents can share the one story with their children. I give H.D. Hunter a standing ovation and five stars. Bravo, H.D. Hunter. Thank you for A Magic Door and A Lost Kingdom of Peace in which I got to know such wonderful new characters.

- Tara Bishop, Reader's Favorite (full review)

 

 

H. D. Hunter is a young writer with an old soul. His first book reflects not only amazing skill, but thoughts deep as the ocean and wise as the oldest man alive. If I must mention favorites I will choose ‘Southern District,’ ‘Hatari Forest,’ And ‘Gridlock,’ not because I think the other ones are any less, but because these brought back an old aspect of myself that was long lost and buried within. When a young writer can do this to a well-read, traveled, older lady from a totally different background, and who happens to be an author and editor, you know this young writer has immeasurable skill, intellect, and heart. 

 - Susan Violante, Reader Views (full review)